Category: Chinese Politics

NIH and FBI Launch Investigations on Chinese Scholars

Tensions between the U.S. and China, such as the ongoing trade conflict, have begun to strain relationships in academia. The National Institutes of Health (NIH), which provides about $26 billion in federal grants every year to biomedical research centers, has launched a massive investigation into foreign scientists suspected of infringing on agency policies. In August 2018, NIH Director Francis Collins wrote to more than 10,000 research institutions that “foreign entities have mounted systematic programs to influence NIH researchers and peer reviewers.” Later in June 2019, the NIH reported to the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance that they reached out...

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China’s Economic Transformation: A Threat to the Liberal Global Order? by Arthur R. Kroeber

“In the phrase of Council on Foreign Relations scholar Elizabeth Economy, “China is an illiberal state seeking leadership in a liberal world order.” This is an unpleasant fact for analysts and policy makers who believed for years that China’s general trajectory under “reform and opening” was towards a less statist economy and a more liberal state whose values and interests were increasingly consistent with those of the global economic system. The central question today therefore is whether, as it gains global influence, China will be generally supportive of the existing global economic system, cause that system to change in significant ways, or result in a dissolution of the present order and its replacement by something else. The answer to this question depends to a great degree on the time frame one uses to describe China’s trajectory. Here we will consider three: the 40 years since the launch of Reform and Opening in 1978, the two decades since the Asian financial crisis of 1997-98, and the decade since the American financial crisis of 2008.” From China’s Economic Transformation: A Threat to the Liberal Global Order? by Arthur R. Kroeber, nonresident Senior Fellow, Brookings-Tsinghua Center and adjunct professor at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. Written for the Carter Center’s symposium to commemorate President Carter’s 1979 decision to normalize relations with China. View or download the paper...

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Chinese Americans and China: A Fraught and Complicated Relationship by Gordon H. Chang

“January 1, 1979 for many Chinese Americans (those of Chinese ancestry who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents) was a joyous moment. They enthusiastically welcomed the normalization of relations between the United States and the People’s Republic of China as it ended the politically charged and long-hostile relationship between the two countries: one, their land of ancestry — no matter that for some it was four or five generations past — and the other, their land of nationality for themselves and their families for now and the future. Few saw the moment as validating the politics of either the PRC or the U.S. – politics per se was not the reason for celebration. A major step toward full social and cultural acceptance in American life was the reason for Chinese American hopefulness.” From Chinese Americans and China: A Fraught and Complicated Relationship by Gordon H. Chang, Olive H. Palmer Professor, Stanford University. Written for the Carter Center’s symposium to commemorate President Carter’s 1979 decision to normalize relations with China. View or download the paper...

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Trump Timeline

Stay up to date with the timeline of Trump and the Trump Administration’s China Policies.

SR: The Week’s China Reads

Robert A. Kapp Bio picture

Every week, China Program’s Senior Advisor Dr. Robert A. Kapp compiles a reading list and provides commentary, for you to better understand China.

Robert A. Kapp is senior advisor to the China Program at the Carter Center. He has been principal of Robert A. Kapp and Associates, a business consulting firm, since 2004. From 1994 through 2004 he served as President of the United States-China Business Council…