Category: USCNPM Original

A Crisis is a Terrible Thing to Waste by Ryan Hass

“The U.S.-China relationship has now reached what respected China scholar David M. Lampton describes as a “tipping point.i” The basic assumptions and expectations that guided the development of U.S.-China relations over the past 40 years no longer hold and, so far, no consensus has formed in either country about what should replace them. This paper seeks to contribute a perspective on the future trajectory of U.S.-China relations by addressing how the relationship reached its current inflection point, why this moment may differ from previous periods of bilateral friction, and what key questions the United States needs to answer about the type of relationship it seeks with China going forward.” From A Crisis is a Terrible Thing to Waste by Ryan Hass, David M. Rubenstein Fellow, John L. Thornton China Center and the Center for East Asia Policy Studies, Brookings Institution. Written for the Carter Center’s symposium to commemorate President Carter’s 1979 decision to normalize relations with China. View or download the paper...

Read More

The United States and China from Partners to Competitors by Harry Harding

“Although the collapse of the Soviet Union had eliminated the common threat that had brought China and the U.S. together in the 1960s and 1970s, there were other reasons to prevent a return to continued confrontation. For the U.S, the economic growth being generated by China’s policy of reform and opening meant that China would play an increasingly important role in Asia and even globally. For China, positive ties with the United States were essential to the success of that policy, given the importance of American capital and American markets. For both governments, therefore, the Sino-American relationship was too important to fail.” From The United States and China from Partners to Competitors by Harry Harding, professor of Public Policy at University of Virginia; visiting professor of Social Science at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Written for the Carter Center’s symposium to commemorate President Carter’s 1979 decision to normalize relations with China. View or download the paper...

Read More

Sino-American Interactions, Past and Future by Amb. Chas W. Freeman, Jr. (USFS, Ret.)

“December 15, 2018 will mark the fortieth anniversary of Jimmy Carter’s and Deng Xiaoping’s politically courageous agreement to “normalize” the relationship between Washington and Beijing. This resulted in the replacement of China’s demand for revolutionary overthrow of the world order with pragmatic accommodation of it. Two days later, at the 3rd Plenum of the 11th Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), Deng launched China on a path of eclectic borrowing of foreign ideas, policies, and practices called “reform and opening” [改革开放]. This liberated the Chinese people – who were then almost a fourth of humanity – from the most suffocating aspects of Soviet Marxist-Leninist dogma and released their formidable entrepreneurial imaginations and energies. The consequences of Deng’s twin decisions for both China and the world have been immense. He saw US-China normalization and “reform and opening” as parts of a single bold gamble with his country’s future. His vision enabled China to risk a search for inspiration in America and other capitalist democracies, to which the Chinese elite promptly entrusted its sons and daughters for education.” From Sino-American Interactions, Past and Future by Amb. Chas W. Freeman, Jr. (USFS, Ret.), Senior Fellow, Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs, Brown University. Written for the Carter Center’s symposium to commemorate President Carter’s 1979 decision to normalize relations with China. View or download the...

Read More

Financial System Engagement and Harmonization by David Dollar

“During the 40 years since the normalization of U.S.-China relations, a key issue has been financial system engagement and harmonization. U.S. public and private institutions have played important roles in the reform and modernization of China’s financial system. China’s financial system, broadly understood, has also been a source of tension and conflict between the two countries from time to time.” From Financial System Engagement and Harmonization by David Dollar, Senior Fellow, John L. Thornton China Center, Brookings Institution. Written for the Carter Center’s symposium to commemorate President Carter’s 1979 decision to normalize relations with China. View or download the paper...

Read More

Chinese Americans and China: A Fraught and Complicated Relationship by Gordon H. Chang

“January 1, 1979 for many Chinese Americans (those of Chinese ancestry who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents) was a joyous moment. They enthusiastically welcomed the normalization of relations between the United States and the People’s Republic of China as it ended the politically charged and long-hostile relationship between the two countries: one, their land of ancestry — no matter that for some it was four or five generations past — and the other, their land of nationality for themselves and their families for now and the future. Few saw the moment as validating the politics of either the PRC or the U.S. – politics per se was not the reason for celebration. A major step toward full social and cultural acceptance in American life was the reason for Chinese American hopefulness.” From Chinese Americans and China: A Fraught and Complicated Relationship by Gordon H. Chang, Olive H. Palmer Professor, Stanford University. Written for the Carter Center’s symposium to commemorate President Carter’s 1979 decision to normalize relations with China. View or download the paper...

Read More

Trump Timeline

Stay up to date with the timeline of Trump and the Trump Administration’s China Policies.

SR: The Week’s China Reads

Robert A. Kapp Bio picture

Every week, China Program’s Senior Advisor Dr. Robert A. Kapp compiles a reading list and provides commentary, for you to better understand China.

Robert A. Kapp is senior advisor to the China Program at the Carter Center. He has been principal of Robert A. Kapp and Associates, a business consulting firm, since 2004. From 1994 through 2004 he served as President of the United States-China Business Council…