Category: Politics

Blaming China over Fentanyl, Is It Fair?

There are some local media made reports claiming “Mexican law enforcement officials recently seized more than 23 tons of fentanyl from China bound for the US”. Some of local Twitter talked about “China continuing to pour poison in our communities”, etc. They are all false. What the Mexican officials seized are actually widely-used industrial chemicals namely calcium chloride and N-phenylpiperidine-4-amine. They are not controlled items by China, the UN, even the US. To some, blaming China might be a cheap convenient way to achieve domestic goals. But is it fair?China exercises stringent control over all drugs including fentanyl-like substances....

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China and America: The Age of Realist Geoeconomics by William H. Overholt

“Post-World War II Asia experienced a transformation of the strategic environment, defined by two changes. For the first time, human beings learned how to grow emerging economies from 7-10 percent annually, a marked change from the industrial revolution’s then-novel 2 percent that fueled creation of the British empire, and from the 3-4 percent that undergirded the emergence of Meiji Japan and of U.S. global dominance. Second, military technology became so destructive that pursuing national greatness in the old way, by seizing neighbors’ territory, usually became at best a path to Pyrrhic victory. This increase in the destructiveness of military technology was not confined to nuclear weapons; conventional air power, sea power, infantry firepower, and even improvised explosive devices are vastly more destructive than in earlier eras. These changes empowered countries whose national strategies deemphasized the traditional way of becoming an important power, namely using the military to seize large amounts of territory from neighbors, and empowered countries whose national strategies gave priority to economic competition. This shift did not mean that the military ever became unimportant; successful defense remained vital. But countries like North Korea and the Soviet Union, which gave overwhelming priority to the military, lost to countries like the U.S., Japan, South Korea, Indonesia and China, which gave priority to building their economies and assigned the military the role of protecting an economics-priority national strategy.” From China and America: The...

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Jintong Li: What Has the Regan-Liu Dialogue Told US

By Jintong Li The “debate” between anchors from Fox and CGTN, Trish Regan and Xin LIU, which covered a range of issues from the “trade war” to intellectual property rights issues, business rules,  and state capitalism, attracted thousands of people online and offline. There was an especially high level of engagement from youth, who weighed in via social media platforms like Twitter and Weibo from both countries. Overall, the respectful and friendly atmosphere demonstrated it was  more of a very productive conversation than a “debate” between two ordinary individuals. This conversation pointed out several aspects of the complicated polyhedron between the two largest economies in the world, which exists in the minds of both countries’ leadership and public in recent years. First, it highlights a psychological problem – the “Trust Dilemma” between the two countries. Under what conditions will the “trade war” come to an end?  Will the U.S. agree with Chinese leaders that China has to be dealt with differently than any other nation because China is a developing country that practices socialism with Chinese characteristics (Liu Xin’s words)? Can China privatize its SOEs in the coming decade and at what schedule? Answers to these questions from the leaders in the two countries are quite divergent and often lead to acrimonious accusations against each other. China and America lack trust between them. In their 2012 seminal report entitled Addressing U.S.-China...

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Chinese and US Engagement with Developing Countries News Roundup: Apr.1 – Apr.8, 2019

Every two weeks, The Carter Center’s China Program releases an overview of major events involving Chinese and US global engagement, with a particular focus on emerging issues in Africa and Latin America. In addition to using news sources, the news roundup will analyze papers and reports from academic journals, governmental bodies, and NGOs, and will also summarize debates and other events organized by think tanks on select issues. The news roundup is intended to be a platform and resource for both China watchers and for readers interested in political and economic development in developing countries. It aims to deepen...

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Chinese and US Engagement with Developing Countries News Roundup: Mar.11 – Mar.29, 2019

Every two weeks, The Carter Center’s China Program releases an overview of major events involving Chinese and US global engagement, with a particular focus on emerging issues in Africa and Latin America. In addition to using news sources, the news roundup will analyze papers and reports from academic journals, governmental bodies, and NGOs, and will also summarize debates and other events organized by think tanks on select issues. The news roundup is intended to be a platform and resource for both China watchers and for readers interested in political and economic development in developing countries. It aims to deepen...

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Trump Timeline

Stay up to date with the timeline of Trump and the Trump Administration’s China Policies.

SR: The Week’s China Reads

Robert A. Kapp Bio picture

Every week, China Program’s Senior Advisor Dr. Robert A. Kapp compiles a reading list and provides commentary, for you to better understand China.

Robert A. Kapp is senior advisor to the China Program at the Carter Center. He has been principal of Robert A. Kapp and Associates, a business consulting firm, since 2004. From 1994 through 2004 he served as President of the United States-China Business Council…