Tag: pollution

Smog Looms Over North and Northeastern China

Northern and Northeastern China have been covered in heavy smog. The smog has influenced one tenth of China’s land territory, according to the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP).  Specifically, the smog covers 630,000 square kilometers of northeastern Chinese land and 380,000 square kilometers of northern Chinese land.  The MEP blamed this latest smog spell on “adverse meteorological conditions.” This smog created a hike in the Air Pollution Index (API) of seven provinces and municipalities, and the Air Quality Index (AQI) hit 500 in 11 cities in northeastern China between November 3rd and November 5th.  The MEP has sent 12...

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A Water Crisis Spanning Borders

Water is essential for life. It makes up 70% of the human body, as well as a portion of all of our foods. Despite its importance, it seems that our global community has only recently started to consider it in policies, and many countries have not adequately addressed issues with water such as shortages and pollution. Two examples of this are from the United States and the People’s Republic of China. The most recent popular case in the US is the case of Flint, Michigan, during which the Flint government allowed its citizens to consume lead contaminated river water...

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Beijing’s Car Controls Not Enough to Beat the Smog

The municipality of Beijing is preparing to introduce new standards for vehicle emissions. But plans to tackle smog in the capital, before the arrival of the Winter Olympics in 2022, have been thwarted by lax environmental regulations elsewhere. A final version of the ‘Beijing VI’ standards is expected later this year following a public consultation that started in 2015. The reforms are expected go further than pre-existing national regulations (‘China V’) to cut petrol vehicle emissions by 40-50% in the long-term. However, polluting vehicles and machinery from outside Beijing will still be allowed to enter the capital with impunity. Tougher emissions standards for new cars will only apply to vehicles sold in Beijing, a large market in...

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To Impress APEC Leaders, China Cracks Down on Beijing Life

As she does every year on the same day, Ms. Zhu hauled a large wreath of multihued paper chrysanthemums to Babaoshan Revolutionary Cemetery in western Beijing. Ms. Zhu, who declined to give her full name, planned to burn it, as Chinese tradition dictates, to honor her husband and parents, who are buried here. But when she reached the cemetery’s Office of Burning on Thursday, she found the ritual had been banned during daytime hours for two weeks. “APEC restrictions,” her friend explained. The ban on burned offerings was one of a cascade of government orders, from the draconian and sweeping...

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The biggest coal consumer in the world is rethinking its energy policy

  A recent report from Greenpeace found that China’s coal consumption declined in the first half of this year and new Chinese government data suggests that the country’s coal imports have dropped. Estimates indicate that by the end of the year, China’s coal imports could be 8 percent below 2013 levels. China imported 18.86 million tonnes of coal in August, the lowest level since September 2012. Part of the reduced demand is due to a slowing Chinese economy. After years of double-digit growth rates, China’s GDP expanded by just 7.7 percent in 2013, and it could struggle to hit its 7.5 percent target this year....

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Suggested Readings

Robert A. Kapp Bio picture

Every week, China Program’s Senior Advisor Dr. Robert A. Kapp compiles a reading list and provides commentary, for you to better understand China.

Robert A. Kapp is senior advisor to the China Program at the Carter Center. He has been principal of Robert A. Kapp and Associates, a business consulting firm, since 2004. From 1994 through 2004 he served as President of the United States-China Business Council…